Posts Tagged ‘animals’

Picture Day, revisited…

Sharing the bounty from the garden:  big bouquet of herbs (basil, dill, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, thyme), small bouquet of flowers (roses, jasmine, salvia, lavender), and eggs from the girls.

Some pretty spring sweeties still holding on.  These only get morning sun, then spend the rest of the day in the shade.

Front porch vignette.

The black urn was filled with violas.  A seed or two dropped into the pot below and viola!  The urn of violas have already said goodbye, but this one is still holding on.  Very sweet.

We are in high gear getting ready for our Australian guest.  Painting, painting, and still more painting going on still.  Hopefully this weekend will see it to the end.  So tired…

“The woods are lovely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.”

Stopping by Wood on a Snowy Evening, Robert Frost

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Show and Tell Day

It’s picture day! 

 

These are the two plants I got at Giverny for the soon-to-be finished sunroom: a moss and a maidenhair fern.  I wished I had saved the actual name of the moss, which I have never grown before.  I have to get better about that.  And yes, that is dust on that shelf.  With construction still in progress, I can’t seem to stay ahead of it.

 

This is the top of our 6 foot high fence in the background of the picture below.  I have never had a rose thrive as much as this one has.  That is the plus of investing in Fortuniana rootstock.  It is adapted for our tropical climate.  It is worth the extra $5 or so.

“The Fortuniana Rose is a natural hybrid apparently developed from the two species roses, Rosa Laevigata ,”The Cherokee Rose” and Rosa Banksia, “Lady Bank’s Rose.” Both of these varieties, as well as Fortuniana, thrive in the southern climate and sandy soils. Fortuniana rootstock not only allows the rose to grow faster, it will also greatly increases the plant’s vigor and the size of its blooms.” from CoolRoses.com (a local rose nursery).

Confederate jasmine…..busting out and smelling pretty!  It is growing amongst honeysuckle also.

This beauty, oddly enough,  is called Golden Dew Drop….not for the showy purple blooms, but because of the seeds.  If you wait to deadhead these, and let them go to seed, you will be rewarded with a string of golden berries….golden dew drops.  If it gets unruly, you can prune it down to about a foot and it will start again.  It is very hardy here.  I LOVE purple flowers in the garden which is what attracted me to this in the first place.  I believe there is a white flowering version of it as well.  It can be trained to grow as a shrub or a single tree. 

This is my “cracker” rose purchased from Giverny last spring.  I had two.  They were not thriving in their first location, so I pulled them up and pruned them way back in the hopes of giving them a new life.  This one made and is covered with blooms and buds.  I have to think the manure compost has something to do with it.

 This is all that is left of my morning glories.  They have gone to seed.  I have just started actually gathering seeds from plants such as this.  I emptied the little pods into a jar and will keep them until next season.  Each pod had four seeds, so next winter I’ll have them in abundance!

A passion vine growing on top of the chicken coop and intermingling with the cedar tree.  I’ll have to trim it back before it chokes the tree.  It was once a little cedar sapling that my grandmother hid in her purse and brought back from Alabama on a plane.  It made her feel like a renegade!  The tree is now over ten feet tall and still growing.  If I ever move, the tree will have to come with me….no matter how big.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANIMAL FARM…

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

 “Hey, Mom….you didn’t really want this rosemary branch, right?” asks Levi (the almost two year old Beagle).

Dog day afternoon…Jasper takes a nap wherever he can find a cool spot, even if it is in the dirt.  Great…

Three of seven chickens asking if I have brought them a treat.  They are a little spoiled.

Five of the Dixie Chicks partake of a scratch grain treat from Dad.  In this picture….two Ameraucanas, two Barred Rocks, and Lucy…the Rhode Island Red.

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